Perhaps the Wait is Over

It has been a long wait, but we now have a tentative plan to open for Sunday morning worship on October 19, 2020.  Perhaps the wait is over!

So, who really likes to wait on things these days?  I mean, we live in a culture where getting things fast is not only the norm, it is the expectation. From our food, to our clothes, to our cash, we like to have it right away. And yet we spend a lot of time waiting.  From waiting in line somewhere, to waiting for that new job we biblical have been hoping for.  We wait!  And while we generally don’t enjoy the wait; for those of us who live by our faith, we often are told that God has blessing through waiting. “The Lord is good to those who wait for him, to the soul who seeks him” Lamentations 3:25.  So the good Lord offers numerous promises of blessings in Scripture for those who “wait,” yet we still struggle with those untimely pauses in life.

So why is waiting such an inconvenience to us?  I am reminded of the numerous stories from Scripture where waiting seemed to be a whole lot more stressful than what you and I go through theses days.  For example:

  • God’s chosen people had to wait 40 years…
  • Abraham had to wait 25 years…
  • Joseph had to wait 13 years…
  • Elijah had to wait 3 and ½ years…

To just name a few.  What seems interesting is that in the fullness of each of these biblical situations, they appear to be waiting for God’s purpose.  Humm…  So, God has allowed us to wait before we can fully come together again as a church family.  Maybe the good Lord is waiting for you and me to see His purpose, His plan, His revelation!

So perhaps the wait is over.  For some, yes, for others, maybe, and still for others, no.  For me, my prayer is; Lord, give me the eyes to see, the ears to hear, and the heart to know…. Your purpose for the wait!

Grace and Peace,

Scott

Expressing Worship Through Living

Last month I wrote an article on “How To Worship Online.” Today I want to continue that thought with some ideas regarding  how we express worship in our daily living.  It is one thing to come into the Sanctuary or the Worship Center or even connect with our phone or computer each Sunday and be a part of corporate worship; expressing praise and adoration to the creator of the universe, singing of our love for our Savior, reading scripture together, praying, hearing the word of God spoken. It is quite another thing, however, to carry these expressions into the outside world, a world where such expressions are quite often eschewed. Here are a few tips on taking your love for God into the world.


  1. Don’t be timid, love God to the fullest in everything you do. We have all heard the expression “What would Jesus do.” Take this expression to heart. Think about your actions in every circumstance: at home interacting with family, at work interacting with co-workers, shopping, driving… Remember how Jesus interacted with others in His life.
  2. Love your neighbor as yourself. Remember that your neighbor is not necessarily the person who lives in  the house next to yours but everyone you encounter during your daily routine. This command of Jesus reminds us that we should treat others in a way that we would want to be treated – with gentleness, with love and kindness.
  3. Look for opportunities to express the love of Jesus. Opportunities abound in which you can invoke your love for Jesus. Be proactive in seeking out these opportunities. A word of peace to a troubled soul, A prayer with someone you may not know who is suffering.  Helping  those who are poor. Visiting the sick. Even making a phone call to someone who is lonely.  Do something to brighten the day for someone who is going through a rough time.
  4. Express the joy of your salvation. Approach life with a positive attitude. It is easy sometimes especially when we let our guard down to lose our joy. Just remember you are a child of God and God wants nothing but the best for you.
  5. Lead others to follow Christ. By word and by deed your faith will be expressed to those around you. Live your life in such a way that others would want to find that spark of joy they see in you. Don’t hesitate to give witness to the saving knowledge you have found in Christ.

There is a familiar statement that is often etched into the stone header over the doors of many churches that reads like this: Enter to Worship – Depart to Serve  The real question for us today is: what will we do when we leave our place of worship. Let us depart to serve.

Bill Tiemann                                                             

Traditional Worship Leader & Pastoral Care Minister

Don’t Get Your Hopes Up!

Really?   Is that the wisdom of the day?  To minimize the desires of the heart so that the sting of disappointment is bearable!  I had hoped that this Covid stuff would have been over by now, but I’m told to not get my hopes up.  I was hoping that we would be having Sunday morning worship together by now, but I guess I had my hopes too high.  I had even hoped that my Texas Longhorns were going to be able to play their rematch with the LSU Tigers, but once again, I am reminded that I shouldn’t have gotten my hopes up.

Well, I don’t know about you, but I am tired of hearing about hopelessness.  In fact, I am sick of it!  One of my favorite Scriptures on hope comes from Proverbs 13:12 “Hope deferred makes the heart sick, but a longing fulfilled is a tree of life.”  Imagine that, having hope but waiting for a future day to be fulfilled by it.  I can understand the world falling into a rut like that, but for those of us who have faith in the Almighty, we don’t have an excuse. For God’s word in Hebrews tells us that “faith is the confidence in what we hope for and assurance about what we do not see (11:1).”  So just because I can’t see hope, doesn’t mean it is not there.

In chapter 5 of the book of Romans, Paul tells us that “hope does not disappoint us,” so why wait, come on, go ahead and get your hopes up!  Dallas Willard tells us that “hope is the confident anticipation of good.”  What a great attitude to have to start your day. You have probably heard it said that there are only two ways to wake up in the morning, “good morning Lord,” or “oh Lord, it’s morning!”  Likewise, you can choose to hope and anticipate good, or default to fear which is “the anticipation of evil.”  So, I don’t know about you, but I want to get my hopes up!

You know, even if we think our hopes have been dashed, the good Lord might have a different plan for us.  Even when we think hope is gone it just might be that we can’t see it yet.  The two disciples on the road to Emmaus on that day of resurrection show us that the greatest of hopes can sometimes be veiled!  You see Luke tells us in his 24th chapter that the two on the road talking to an unrecognizable Jesus confessed “we had hoped that he (Jesus) would be the one who was going to set Israel free!” Little did they know at the time that hope was looking at them square in the eyes.

So, I acknowledge to you that I have listened to the world proclaim, “don’t get your hopes up,” one time too many.  I choose not to defer hope. How, you might ask?  By meditating on God’s word, that’s how. You see, the two on the road to Emmaus, received hope and initially didn’t even know it.  “And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he (Jesus) explained to them what was said in all the Scriptures concerning himself (Luke 24:27).”  That revelation gave them the hope that they thought they had lost.  In Jesus Christ there is always hope!

So even though we continue to have Covid in our lives today, we still have hope. And even though we are not gathering Sunday mornings yet, we have hope for the day we will.  And you know, it’s not a big deal Texas and LSU won’t be playing their game together, Texas would have won anyway!

Grace and Peace,

Scott Kaak

How to Worship Online

By Bill Tiemann

It has been quite a long time since we have been able to gather in person for worship. Because of the covid-19 pandemic worshiping online has been the only option available to us. You may be wondering just exactly how does one worship online? To answer this question let us first determine what worship is. According to Miriam Webster the definition of worship is: 1. to honor or show reverence for a divine being or supernatural power and 2. to regard with great or extravagant respect, honor, or devotion. Worship is a verb, indicating that there is to be some sort of action, an expression, a demonstration. Worship is not something that is just watched or observed.

Scripture tells us that we are to express our love and devotion to our God through the singing of psalms,  hymns and spiritual songs.  We show reverence as we come before our God with our prayers and words of affirmation. We express our extravagant respect as we hear the word of God being taught by our pastor. These are all things that require some sort of action from us. That’s easy, you say, when we are gathered with the entire congregation, but it feels silly for me to sit on my couch in front of my TV or device singing a hymn or song out loud. Let me ask you this question then: do you feel silly screaming and expressing your joy and delight in front of your TV when your favorite football or baseball team is winning? Probably not. Let us all worship in spirit and in truth expressing our sincerest love and respect for God as we gather in spirit through the media of video worship.

Here are some practical tips on how to worship online

  1. Prepare your heart for worship: before you push that play button on your device spend a few moments in prayer asking the spirit of God to be with you and to open your heart to accept a word from Him.
  2. Sing the hymns and songs aloud expressing your innermost love and respect for God. Sing quietly if you must or even sing within your heart but sing the words as an expression of worship.
  3. Read aloud the words of affirmation and scripture readings as if you were gathered with the larger congregation.
  4. Hear the Word of God: Listen to the words of the teaching from the pastor and apply them to your life as you go forward in your daily living.
  5. Hear the still small voice of God: sensing the leadership of the Holy Spirit as you worship.
  6. Give of your Best: Remember that the giving of your tithes and offerings is also an act of worship. Things are different now, at least for the time being, which means you may have to give online or through the mail but giving is important.
  7. Go forth to serve: Corporate worship (when we are all gathered in person) is extremely important. Remember that real worship expresses itself as we go about our daily lives. We live out our expression of adoration and praise to God as we interact with our friends and neighbors in the workplace, where we shop, at school and online.

To God Alone Be Glory and Praise

Bill Tiemann

Traditional Worship Leader &
Pastoral Care Minister
Christ Church United Methodist

Pentecost – When the Spirit Moves Through Children

Almighty God, on this day through the outpouring of the Holy Spirit, you revealed the way of eternal life to every race and nation. Pour out this gift anew, that by the preaching of the Gospel, your salvation may reach to the ends of the earth; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, forever and ever. Amen.
– Book of Common Prayer

Spring Break and the Spirit

During one spring break in college, I was a part of a smaller team made up of students from our college ministry, scouting our missionary opportunities in Belize. I spent an entire day in the back of a truck with one of my buddies named Ryan. We were driven from village to village across the country by a man we had met for the first time early that morning. Soon, we pulled up to an orphanage at sundown to join the rest of our group, who had been playing with the children for most of the day. 

I was supposed to give a sermon that night after dinner during worship. Before the trip, I had prepared what I might talk about, what Scripture I could use, what stories I could tell, etc. But after spending a few days in Belize, and an entire day in the back of a truck and helping with various physical tasks, I realized that nothing I had prepared would have mattered.  

When we got out of the truck, Ryan and I made a beeline to this small concrete plot with a basketball goal and joined some of the kids from the orphanage for a game of two on two. It was during this game where I realized that what I had prepared to talk about wasn’t going to work. 

We were called into their bigger room, and I was asked to find a spot toward the front of the room. Sweating and still catching my breath from the game, my mind started to race as I thought about what I would say when I got up to speak. I couldn’t think of anything, so I prayed. I asked that God would still use me and give me words. 

So I stood up, looked at all of the children – ranging from babies to a couple of guys who had just turned 18 and were soon going to be leaving home – and I smiled. The only words I could say were, “Jesus loves you.” I remember asking, “Do you know that? Do you know that Jesus loves you?” And as those words came out of my mouth, every child broke out in song – “Jesus loves me this I know…” 

And as I smiled even bigger, tears started rolling down my face. I have never been so moved by the Spirit in my entire life. 

Pentecost

We are told that when the day of Pentecost came, Jesus’ disciples were together and sitting in a house. Now, we are told that among them were the original 11 disciples, a new guy named Matthias (who had just been added to the 11), some certain women, Jesus’ mom, and Jesus’ brothers. We know they are back in Jerusalem, and they are sitting in a house, and I would guess that they are a bit on edge. Jesus, now risen from the dead and ascended into heaven, has informed them that they are to receive the Holy Spirit and be his witnesses in Jerusalem (where they are), Judea, Samaria, and to the ends of the earth. Then, as they were watching Jesus ascend, some angels asked them what they were doing and told them to get on with it – to get back to Jerusalem because Jesus has given them something to do. 

But now, they are sitting in a house in Jerusalem – waiting. 

I am sure they were praying. They were probably discussing all of this over and coming up with the best plan as to how they might actually carry out this whole “witnessing” thing that Jesus has given them to do. 

And then, it got really loud…think wind tunnel, the rush of air thundering in your ear so loud that you can’t think kind of loud. And then, tongues of fire. Yes, you read that right. Tongues of fire appear above the disciples’ heads, glowing as they descend upon each of them and rest there. The disciples are then filled with the Holy Spirit, giving them the ability to speak the languages of all who are present in Jerusalem – those who have come to celebrate the Feast of Weeks (Pentecost). 

Of course, you are probably familiar with what happens next. Crowds gather together. People are amazed but shocked. The disciples are accused of being drunk at 9 am. And Peter delivers an incredible sermon. Then, 3,000 people come to faith and are baptized. The church of Jesus Christ is birthed. 

For the followers of Jesus today, Pentecost provides the opportunity to become aware of the gift of the Spirit and the birth of the church. Because God’s Spirit came to us, we as Christ’s body have been brought to life and given the power to know God’s will and do it. 

Here is the thing though… 

This world presents plenty of challenges. To be completely transparent, most of the time, I feel like the disciples might have felt when Jesus was ascending to heaven before their eyes. I would surely have been thinking, “Oh no, what now?” Surely they began to feel hopeless or worried, even with Jesus’ final words still ringing in their ears. At least one of them must have asked, “How am I supposed to do that? If they killed Jesus, what will they do with me?” 

Think about your life. If you are like me, there have been moments of doubt, despair, or helplessness – especially when we see racism lead to the death of men who need not have been murdered, or while we live in the midst of a global pandemic. Confusion and weariness are natural feelings that come during such times. 

It can lead to a deep loss of hope. It can lead us into a place of complacency.  

Enter Pentecost. God’s Spirit rushes in and shakes us out of our complacency and renews our hopes. Though things may be dire and life may present incredible challenges, the good news we learn from Pentecost is that Jesus was not lying when he said he would “be with us always until the end of the age.” The Spirit of God enables us to live out and live for justice, peace, mercy, and love. We are given new life, the church is born, and we celebrate the power of life in the Spirit. 

This is the life we are called to – a life in the Spirit where we live in relationship with God, with our selves, with our neighbors, and with the world around us. A life seeking God’s Kingdom and His will to be done. 

Little Children and the Spirit

I felt a little bit like the disciples might have felt when Jesus ascended as we pulled up to the orphanage that evening in Belize. I had prepared and knew that I had been given an opportunity to share about Jesus. Before leaving Chattanooga, I had thought through some ideas for a great sermon. But then I got to the children’s home, played with them, laughed with them, and got to know them. I started to think, “Oh no. What now?” 

And then, at the mention of Jesus and his love for us, the Spirit rushed in. Instead of a wind tunnel and the sound of air so loud and intense that one could not hear themselves think, the Spirit moved through little children. Sweet, innocent, and beautiful children. As the Spirit moved, I stopped talking and got out of the way. As the Spirit moved, all I needed to do was watch and receive. And that is the heart of Pentecost, isn’t it?  

Let the Spirit move. Watch. Receive.  

May we have eyes to see this Pentecost. May we have ears to hear. May we have hearts open to receive what the Spirit may be trying to do in us.

 

[author] [author_info]Michael is the grateful husband to Sara. They are the lucky parents of their son, Grady. Michael has earned a B.A. in Religious Studies from UT-Chattanooga, and a Master of Divinity with an emphasis in Church Planting from Asbury Theological Seminary. Michael enjoys spending time with Sara, running, good coffee, reading, and playing with their son. Being from Memphis, he is an avid Memphis Grizzlies fan.[/author_info] [/author]